Spring Branch Community Health Center provides low- and no-cost screenings to promote cancer prevention and education.

Houston, TX – This March, the Spring Branch Community Health Center (SBCHC) is ramping up a collaboration with the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center to increase the number of patients that receive free colorectal cancer screenings. M.D. Anderson staff has trained providers at all three SBCHC clinics to assess the eligibilty of asymptomatic patients at average risk to encourage participation in the screening program.

“Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States,” said Luis Zelaya, Programs Manager at SBCHC. “Building awareness is an important part of increasing screening rates and ultimately saving lives.”

Screening tests look for cancer before a person has any signs or symptoms. Regular screenings can catch some cancers early, when they’re small, have not spread, and are easier to treat. With colorectal cancer, these tests can even prevent cancer from developing in the first place. Screening tests help prevent colorectal cancer by finding precancerous polyps (abnormal growths) so they can be removed.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that men and women between the ages of 50 and 75 get screened for colorectal cancer regularly. Colorectal cancer is often preventable, and early detection and treatment are critical.

Spring Branch Community Health Center has five clinic locations open six days a week that offer discounted medical services and free education programs. For clinic hours, directions and parking information visit www.sbchc.net or call (713) 462-6565.

About SBCHC
SBCHC was formed in 2003 and began providing comprehensive health care services to indigent and low-income patients in the Spring Branch community in May 2004. Designated as a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) in September 2005, SBCHC offers medical care, mental health, and dental care for both children and adults regardless of income.

According to the CDC-Among cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon or rectum) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Every year, about 140,000 Americans are diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and more than 50,000 people die from it. But this disease is highly preventable, by getting screened beginning at age 50.

Screening tests help prevent colorectal cancer by finding precancerous polyps (abnormal growths) so they can be removed. Screening also finds this cancer early, when treatment can be most effective.

Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Colorectal Cancer Personal Screening Stories Screen for Life Campaign Quiz